Brauner Microphones: Info & Media: FAQ

FAQ


  1. What is the tonal difference between the Phantom and Phanthera?
  2. What is the tonal difference between the VM1 and the VMX?
  3. What is the tonal difference between the VM1 and the Valvet?
  4. What is the right preamp for my microphone?
  5. Where is the difference between the standard and the lite versions of VM1/VMX?
  6. Why aren't there any frequency response diagrams published on the Brauner website?
1. What is the tonal difference between the Phantom and Phanthera?
The Phantom and the Phanthera embody our two basic approaches to sonic reproduction and both guarantee an optimum performance according to your personal preferences:

The Phantom delivers a very natural and transparent sonic character with ultimate resolution of finest sonic detail. It is the utmost microphone for the purist who wants it really lifelike.

The Phanthera comes with the same fine attributes but additionally highlights the sonic character of a signal source recorded with it in a very subtle, absolutely unobtrusive manner. It brings an enormous portion of the typical tube microphone character.


2. What is the tonal difference between the VM1 and the VMX?
Our microphone portfolio can be categorized into two tonal groups: natural sounding and charming microphones. The VM1 is a natural sounding microphone with a fresh modern sound and finest resolution of acoustic detail with a transparent sound characteristic. The VMX also offers a very fine resolution, but has a charming sound emphasizing the tonal details in a subtle manner.


3. What is the tonal difference between the VM1 and the Valvet?
Our microphone portfolio can be categorized into two tonal groups: natural sounding and charming microphones, both the VM1 and the Valvet belong to the natural sounding fraction.

The Valvet was developed to offer the VM1's tube technology in a smaller (and more affordable) microphone design. Though the Valvet sounds close to the VM1, the VM1's exceptional resolution and transparence were modeled into a more forgiving sonic character but without the cost of any audible lack of detail. It still sounds remarkable and Brauner-like! This made the Valvet the perfect choice for people who still want to achive great recordings in an environment with poor acoustic preferences. In a good sounding room the Valvet really becomes superior and an outstanding spot mic. ("Strings and Brass sound larger than life!", Malcom Luker, Senior Master Scoring Engineer tells us.)

The Valvet can be used in cardioid and omni mode whereas the VM1 can be variably set to ALL patterns from omni to figure of eight. Also, the VM1 is shipped with the bigger suspension BMS1 and an especially adapted pop screen. Of course, the exclusive VOVOX Tubelink cable comes with all of our tube microphones.


4. What is the right preamp for my microphone?
Choosing the right preamp for your microphone is similar to choosing the right microphone. It all depends on your individual preference in sound. We can just advise you to always test a preamp within the whole recording chain, thus giving you an impression whether all elements harmonize in the way you want them to.


5. Where is the difference between the standard and the lite versions of VM1/VMX?
The lite versions (discontinued) shipped with a reduced set of accessories. Their control units offered cardiod and omni patterns and had a phase reverse switch, whereas those of the standard versions can be set variably to all patterns between omni and figure of eight and have a 10dB pad. The standard versions also ship with different suspensions (BMS1 instead of BMS2) and come with a pop screen.

The microphones themselves are identical in both standard and lite versions. We do not use sub-standard goods! All our microphones meet up to the same high level of requirements and guarantee high end and high tech perfection "Made in Germany". Should you have a lite version, be sure it is still being fully supported by Brauner now and in the future.


6. Why aren't there any frequency response diagrams published on the Brauner website?
Unbound from the old paradigm that followed mainly technicals ideals, which we fulfill where it is neccessary and makes sense, first and foremost we like to follow our own perception - We think a microphone is ultimately made to be the first and most important link in the recording chain. A chain used to create content to unfold before the listener with the greatest possible impact.

Of course, frequency response diagrams give information on some of the microphone's behavior in regards to its individual response according to the measured frequency range. But as we develope and manufacture microphones not mainly from a technical point of view but rather put an emphasis on the more important as more direct human perception of sound, we do not think of frequency response diagrams to explain a microphone's tonal character sufficiently enough. Other usefull scientific information we would consider relevant (e.g. the time response characteristics) is not expressed in these diagrams.

For this reason Brauner Microphones has decided to go down the road to develop their own very unique scientific measuring technique allowing our engineers and physicists to dissect the heard information into many different measuring systems which complement and interact with each other. This will give us the possibility to comprehend in great detail some of the secrets of human hearing incorporating its demands and quality aspects and to get closer to it using analytic measuring technology from within this perspective. This a fascinating and also very own way.

In principle a smoothed frequency response diagram looks about the same for all large diaphragm microphones anyway, due to the characteristic of a large diaphragm. The high frequency boost you see in the diagram results from the stasis of airpressure in front of the diaphragm. So even if all large diaphragm microphones have this measured high frequency boost: Is it always audible as well? - As you might know it is not!
So what information does a frequency response diagram really give us in hand? A dB value of level corresponding to a frequency sweep, but no authoritive standard to express the perceived value of loudness of a real life signal!

Do it like us! Don't rely on smoothed frequency response diagrams too much. Listen and judge with your ears!